Liturgies

Our inclusive language liturgies set the structure and theme of Sunday morning worship. All liturgies are written by the Celebration Circle Mission Group.

Click here for an archive of our liturgies.

Feel free to use what is helpful from these liturgies. We only ask that when substantial portions are abstracted or used in a written work, please credit Seekers Church and cite the URL.

2021 Epiphany: Radiant Hope

Click here for a printable copy of the 2021 Epiphany Liturgy

ENTRANCE

REFLECTION

So may we know
the hope
that is not just
for someday
but for this day—
here, now,
in this moment
that opens to us:
hope not made
of wishes
but of substance,
hope made of sinew
and muscle
and bone,
hope that has breath
and a beating heart,
hope that will not
keep quiet
and be polite,
hope that knows
how to holler
when it is called for,
hope that knows
how to sing
when there seems
little cause,
hope that raises us
from the dead—
not someday
but this day,
every day,
again and
again and
again.

Jan Richardson, The Cure for Sorrow. P 163
Find other resources by Jan Richardson at https://www.janrichardson.com,
Used by permission

2020 Advent: Waiting for Revelation

Click here for a printable copy of the 2020 Advent Liturgy

ENTRANCE

REFLECTION

The season of Advent means there is something on the horizon the likes of which we have never seen before. … What is possible is to not see it, to miss it, to turn just as it brushes past you. And you begin to grasp what it was you missed, like Moses in the cleft of the rock, watching God’s hindquarters fade in the distance. So stay. Sit. Linger. Tarry. Ponder. Wait. Behold. Wonder. There will be time enough for running. For rushing. For worrying. For pushing. For now, stay. Wait. Something is on the horizon.

Jan Richardson, Night Visions: Searching the Shadows of Advent and Christmas, p. xiii

 

2020 Jubilee Liturgy: Witnesses to God With Us

Click here for a printable copy of the 2020 Jubilee Liturgy

ENTRANCE

REFLECTION

That is what Jesus did: he did not return the negative energy directed at him—not during his life nor when he hung on the cross. He held it inside and made it into something much better. That is how “he took away the sin of the world.” He refused to pass it on!

Richard Rohr, “Transforming Our Pain,” at https://cac.org/transforming-our-pain-2020-09-18/

2020 Recomittment Liturgy: The Mind of Christ in Us

 click here for a printable copy of the 2020 Recommitment Liturgy






ENTRANCE

REFLECTION

And this is it. This is the life we get here on earth. We get to give away what we receive. We get to believe in each other. We get to forgive and be forgiven. We get to love imperfectly. And we never know what effect it will have for years to come. And all of it…all of it is completely worth it.”

Nadia Bolz-Weber, Accidental Saints: Finding God in All the Wrong People, p. 172

2020 Summer Liturgy: Hearing Stories Again for the First Time

click here for a printable copy of the 2020 Summer Liturgy

 

Top, Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last Supper, 1495-98. Bottom, doctors at a hospital in Paris performing a tableau vivant of the painting. Top, Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last Supper, 1495-98. Bottom, doctors at a hospital in Paris performing a tableau vivant of the painting. ISNI – InterSyndicale Nationale des Internes/Facebook

ENTRANCE

REFLECTION

The basic fact is that Christianity as it was born in the mind of this Jewish teacher and thinker appears as a technique of survival for the oppressed. That it became, through the intervening years, a religion of the powerful and the dominant, used sometimes as an instrument of oppression, must not tempt us into believing that it was thus in the mind and life of Jesus. … Wherever his spirit appears, the oppressed gather fresh courage; for he announced the good news that fear, hypocrisy, and hatred, the three hounds of hell that track the trail of the disinherited, need have no dominion over them.

Howard Thurman, Jesus and the Disinherited, p 29

 

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